Gena Brodie Robbins

Oil | Acrylic | Mixed Media

Studio #96

386-338-1735

genabrodie.com

scadartsales,com

dk gallery.us

 

Brodie was awarded the Masters of Fine Arts Degree in Painting from Savannah College of Art and Design in 2005 where she was also awarded the New York Studio Space Scholarship held at the Elizabeth Foundation for the Arts in N.Y., New York. Brodie was also awarded internships at the Triangle Artist Workshop in Brooklyn and at Exit Art Gallery in New York City. She has studied under Daniel Green at the Art Students' League in New York City and taken numerous workshops at the Scottsdale Artists School in Scottsdale, Arizona. Once Brodie completed internships in New York, and graduated from SCAD, Brodie then Directed Hollingsworth Gallery in Palm Coast, Florida. Brodie has since then taught foundation courses in Drawing and Two-Dimensional Design at Savannah College of Art and Design in Savannah, Georgia and has created portraits of Lucy Stubbs (Jamie Alexander), Christmas Moultrie (Chiwetel Ejiofor) and other props for the feature film, “Savannah” directed by Annette Heyward-Carter. Brodie is mostly known for her large scale abstract works investigating struggle, implication, position, and the ephemeral states of time and existence. Brodie has exhibited in China, France, and the U.S. She is widely collected and has won awards such as the Florida Artist Group’s Richard Dean Andruk Award curated by Sam Gilliam. Brodie is currently living in Cumming, Ga., and maintains a studio at the Tannery Row ArtistColony in Buford GA. Brodie is represented by dk Contemporary Gallery in Marietta, GA and SCAD Exhibitions in Savannah, GA.

Current bodies of work  stem from an interest with the various emotions and moods that can be visually created through subtle and dramatic light in combination with the abstract human form. Internal and External illumination is explored through layers of transparent neutrals, transitioning warm and cool darks, and the application of thick contrasting, colorful bold marks. Intuitive, abstract swipes are made, and through the expressive ritual of scraping away and adding paint, figures emerge to discern a quiet need to be heard.